Tag Archives: Ramona Koval

Remembering Günter Grass…

Truth shines up through the cracks 16 September 2006 The Age The idea of an author rarely matches the reality, but character flaws are still insightful, writes Ramona Koval. I WAS IN EDINBURGH A FEW weeks ago, working at the International Book Festival, and I was called on by my ABC colleagues to report on what […]

On writing, editing and vodka shots

The first in a two-part email conversation between author Ramona Koval and senior editor David Winter about writing, editing and the benefits of an occasional shot of vodka. David Winter: Hi, Ramona. Well, here we are two weeks from printing Bloodhound. We’re down to the last corrections to the proofs. Once it’s all ready, we’ll […]

On the death of Malcolm Fraser, Australia’s 22nd Prime Minister.

Today Malcolm Fraser died at the age of eighty-four. I interviewed him only once, on the occasion of the publication of his political memoire co-authored by my colleague at the Centre for Advancing Journalism at the University of Melbourne, Dr Margaret Simons. Here’s a transcript of our conversation from 09/04/2010. *** Malcolm Fraser has had […]

Vale Terry Pratchett: 28/04/48 – 12/03/15

Sir Terry Pratchett has died aged sixty-six , eight years after being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s disease. He spoke to me on 18/04/11 in Melbourne where he was particularly interested in conveying his feelings and thoughts about his illness and the idea of his impending death. Here is  the audio and below, a transcript of our […]

Vale Colleen McCullough, 1/6/1937 – 29/1/2015

Writer Colleen McCullough, one of Australia’s most successful writers of popular fiction has died  at the age of seventy-seven. The Thorn Birds which was published in 1977 was her most well-known work, but she was known too for her historical series on the Roman Republic and her crime novels too. Here below is my interview from 1995 which […]

What do scientists have on their bookshelves? Reading on Vocation @ The Wheeler Centre

I’m currently putting the finishing touches to my new book Bloodhound: searching for my father  (Text) to be published on May 1st, so I haven’t been able to blog much. But here’s a blast from the recent past – In this instalment of Reading on Vocation, I introduce the reading habits and histories of three noted scientists […]

A conversation with Robert Dessaix

I can’t tell you how how pleased I was to speak recently to  Robert Dessaix at Melbourne’s Wheeler Centre. It’s not just that his new book, What Days are for, is perfect. And it’s not just that his voice is singular – his knowledge, his wisdom, his sense of humour, his sharpness, his candour, his ways with […]

The Monthly Book – November 2014, Michel Faber’s The Book of Strange New Things

  This month’s Monthly Book should keep you intrigued for the summer – it’s a novel of love and grief, a dystopian travelogue, a triumph of imaginative fiction with interests in story, language, the body, the environment and the power of belief. My interview with Michel Faber is here, and the transcript appears below. Michel […]

Richard Flanagan wins Man Booker Prize!

The Narrow Road to the Deep North is Richard Flanagan’s wonderful novel which has just won this year’s Man Booker Prize! You can watch my interview with Richard for The Monthly Book  here or read the transcript below: Heroism, goodness, mateship, war, enmity, class, memory, self-delusion, passion, guilt, honour and loyalty – these are just some […]

James Wood in the New Yorker discovers Elizabeth Harrower

Congratulations to Elizabeth Harrower for the wonderful feature on her work from James Wood in the New Yorker magazine this week. Here’s our conversation for The Monthly Book from October 2013. And below, my introduction to her wonderful novel The Catherine Wheel, just republished by Text in their Classics series. Playing with Fire by Ramona […]